Artificial Intelligence and Future of the Construction Industry

DevOps – Future Continues Forward

There are certain hard-to-define things in this world that you can’t pin down until you see them in action. DevOps is one of those things for many professionals in the tech world. What are we talking about when we bring up DevOps? The main reason why it can be hard to give a dictionary definition of DevOps is that the term is not linked to one particular toolkit or set of processes. You will essentially know DevOps when you see it happening around you. However, some firm characteristics are almost always present when DevOps is in motion.

The Undeniable Footprint of DevOps

What are the key signs that you’re seeing DevOps at work? It’s just as important to know about the end goal of DevOps as it is to know about how it works. The definition of DevOps is found in its goals. The big goal is to achieve quality in a more streamlined, continual and organic way. DevOps in its proper form will reduce an operation’s dependence on formal quality control (QC). That’s because the quality is built directly into the product starting from the first phase of development instead of being viewed as an aftermarket factor that needs to be measured and tweaked just before a rollout. What’s more, quality is not a one-time concern. A plan that is in a state of synergistic and constant improvement is also a hallmark of DevOps. Here are some telltale characteristics of DevOps:

  • Open, constant collaboration and communication between people in different roles and departments throughout the life cycle of a development project.
  • Cloud-based options over hardware whenever possible.
  • Precise monitoring and use of metrics.
  • An obsession with the experience of the end-user on the part of all designers, developers, analysts, project leaders, and managers.
  • The use of automation for the sake of accuracy and speed whenever appropriate.
  • Faster development.

You really can’t talk about DevOps without putting the spotlight on collaboration above all else. The reason why quality control is transformed from a final touch to a starting point with DevOps is that collaboration is present from the beginning. Software is no longer just a software engineer’s problem in a DevOps environment. People working in research, design, production and endpoint roles are all part of the process from an idea’s inception. It all comes together to focus on before-the-fact troubleshooting instead of catch-up troubleshooting.

The idea that everyone can be involved in the process of making a great product is still pretty foreign in most industries and organizations. However, DevOps only works when barriers are broken down between departments to facilitate communication and collaboration among people with different roles and skillsets. Developers and IT staff members must confront any disconnect or wall building that occurs by default. The “assembly line” should look like a continuous stream of developing and testing a product without the feeling that two different departments are trying to merge processes.

How can you get as many people to the table as possible? It starts with a leadership team with the right understanding and enthusiasm when it comes to DevOps. The blueprint must be put down to create an engaged workforce that trusts leadership to try something new. An engaged workforce will have enough trust to not become suspicious or uncomfortable when boundaries between departments and roles are broken down in favor of a “one team” mentality. Enterprises benefit from a single backlog of work instead of a mosaic-style workflow that forces leaders and teams to try to create a picture from a million different pieces.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

What Happens When DevOps Is Used?

The use of DevOps can go against the instincts of leaders at first glance. Doesn’t conventional wisdom convince us to leave the expertise to the experts? Do developers want the opinions and input of people from non-tech roles being given weight? The role of DevOps is not to make one person’s job everybody’s job. We all know that nobody is an expert when everybody is an expert. However, what DevOps does so beautifully is to use the collective intelligence within an organization to ensure that even the brightest developers don’t get trapped in a maze of their own making.

DevOps is a hard-to-pin-down concept with some very concrete results. The big thing to know is that every big-box retailer, major streaming service and the online marketplace are already using DevOps. Many major enterprises are using DevOps to create insanely user-friendly apps, develop internal software that intelligently predicts and capitalizes on customer habits and engage customers through trust. Those companies are seeing better customer engagement, a reduction in bugs, diminished lag times and an increase in the ability to make intuitive changes based on real-time data.

Why Leaders at Enterprises of All Sizes Need to Be Aware of DevOps

Why can’t even small and emerging enterprises afford to ignore DevOps? DevOps is simply where we’re at in tech at the moment. The good news is that there’s no reason to get dragged along kicking and screaming when it comes to DevOps. A company’s leadership has everything to gain by using at least some of the principles of DevOps to build products or develop operations. The beauty of DevOps is that this method allows you to see the maximum that your current workforce can do. DevOps just make what you already have even better. Are you letting barriers slow things down and hold back breakthroughs? Explore what DevOps in motion could look like at your enterprise.

DevOps – Future Continues Forward

There are certain hard-to-define things in this world that you can’t pin down until you see them in action. DevOps is one of those things for many professionals in the tech world. What are we talking about when we bring up DevOps? The main reason why it can be hard to give a dictionary definition of DevOps is that the term is not linked to one particular toolkit or set of processes. You will essentially know DevOps when you see it happening around you. However, some firm characteristics are almost always present when DevOps is in motion.

The Undeniable Footprint of DevOps

What are the key signs that you’re seeing DevOps at work? It’s just as important to know about the end goal of DevOps as it is to know about how it works. The definition of DevOps is found in its goals. The big goal is to achieve quality in a more streamlined, continual and organic way. DevOps in its proper form will reduce an operation’s dependence on formal quality control (QC). That’s because the quality is built directly into the product starting from the first phase of development instead of being viewed as an aftermarket factor that needs to be measured and tweaked just before a rollout. What’s more, quality is not a one-time concern. A plan that is in a state of synergistic and constant improvement is also a hallmark of DevOps. Here are some telltale characteristics of DevOps:

  • Open, constant collaboration and communication between people in different roles and departments throughout the life cycle of a development project.
  • An obsession with the experience of the end-user on the part of all designers, developers, analysts, project leaders, and managers.
  • The use of automation for the sake of accuracy and speed whenever appropriate.
  • Cloud-based options over hardware whenever possible.
  • Precise monitoring and use of metrics.
  • Faster development.

You really can’t talk about DevOps without putting the spotlight on collaboration above all else. The reason why quality control is transformed from a final touch to a starting point with DevOps is that collaboration is present from the beginning. Software is no longer just a software engineer’s problem in a DevOps environment. People working in research, design, production and endpoint roles are all part of the process from an idea’s inception. It all comes together to focus on before-the-fact troubleshooting instead of catch-up troubleshooting.

The idea that everyone can be involved in the process of making a great product is still pretty foreign in most industries and organizations. However, DevOps only works when barriers are broken down between departments to facilitate communication and collaboration among people with different roles and skillsets. Developers and IT staff members must confront any disconnect or wall building that occurs by default. The “assembly line” should look like a continuous stream of developing and testing a product without the feeling that two different departments are trying to merge processes.

How can you get as many people to the table as possible? It starts with a leadership team with the right understanding and enthusiasm when it comes to DevOps. The blueprint must be put down to create an engaged workforce that trusts leadership to try something new. An engaged workforce will have enough trust to not become suspicious or uncomfortable when boundaries between departments and roles are broken down in favor of a “one team” mentality. Enterprises benefit from a single backlog of work instead of a mosaic-style workflow that forces leaders and teams to try to create a picture from a million different pieces.

 

 

 

 

What Happens When DevOps Is Used?

The use of DevOps can go against the instincts of leaders at first glance. Doesn’t conventional wisdom convince us to leave the expertise to the experts? Do developers want the opinions and input of people from non-tech roles being given weight? The role of DevOps is not to make one person’s job everybody’s job. We all know that nobody is an expert when everybody is an expert. However, what DevOps does so beautifully is to use the collective intelligence within an organization to ensure that even the brightest developers don’t get trapped in a maze of their own making.

DevOps is a hard-to-pin-down concept with some very concrete results. The big thing to know is that every big-box retailer, major streaming service and the online marketplace are already using DevOps. Many major enterprises are using DevOps to create insanely user-friendly apps, develop internal software that intelligently predicts and capitalizes on customer habits and engage customers through trust. Those companies are seeing better customer engagement, a reduction in bugs, diminished lag times and an increase in the ability to make intuitive changes based on real-time data.

Why Leaders at Enterprises of All Sizes Need to Be Aware of DevOps

Why can’t even small and emerging enterprises afford to ignore DevOps? DevOps is simply where we’re at in tech at the moment. The good news is that there’s no reason to get dragged along kicking and screaming when it comes to DevOps. A company’s leadership has everything to gain by using at least some of the principles of DevOps to build products or develop operations. The beauty of DevOps is that this method allows you to see the maximum that your current workforce can do. DevOps just make what you already have even better. Are you letting barriers slow things down and hold back breakthroughs? Explore what DevOps in motion could look like at your enterprise.

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